Why Remaking A Film Is Classed As Copycat Behaviour

Now and then you find filmmakers who take a once popular movie and change some of its features while retaining the main plot. Remaking films are a common phenomenon in all countries and languages. Trends might be changing: technology in filmmaking has reached new heights and new stars are replacing once popular stars with their looks and acting skills. Remaking films is a “never ending magic” on the silver screen.

But, why do people say remaking a movie is the work of copycats? Why don’t people think the remaking of a movie is a creative choice? Particularly in a country like India: India is the first country in the world for remaking films from different languages and transcribing them into their mother tongue.

When filmmakers choose a blockbuster hit, their task becomes almost effortless as casting is the main action they need to take. Roles undertaken by the replacement actors are thought to be easier as they act out the emotions previously performed. Unfortunately, film critics do not consider “remakes” equal to straight films and label filmmakers as copycats. Remaking a film is challenging as makers have to bring back all the emotions shown in the original movie so as to strike a chord with audiences.

The concept of “then and now” and “here and there” takes skill, as directors have to take into account changes in the script to suit the sensibilities of their native traditions, costumes, geographical differences and dialogues. Therefore, remaking a film can be said to be more challenging than a straight or original movie. We have seen hundreds of remakes become a dud at the box-office, so it is not easy to match the expectations of audiences. It is a great belief of filmmakers they can score a hit without difficulty, but sometimes their expectations are not met.

Remaking movies and creating more emotions than in the original version can be complex. Remakes usually do not reach the same “hit level” as the original version. It is just a safe game for producers and the stars who have already become famous. Inspirations for movies often come from everyday happenings. Where movie making is concerned, either you find a new concept or an existing movie to remake.

There is no way one can predict the success of a remake and sometimes what was once a blockbuster might turn into a disaster when remade. Concepts for a movie might come from reading a book or a newspaper, or an inspiration from a real life story. Therefore, remaking involves using the basics of an existing movie and adding one or two different events. Moviegoers have to be drawn into the story and believe it is the creative choice of the film directors.